Observing World Elder Abuse Awareness Day, June 15, 2018

A Wee Highland coo…

WEEAD is Friday! If you want to show support in social media for this day, try this Thunderclap link to add your voice.  I write this post after a move to a new office, which is comfortable and spacious, where I am nestled amidst tenants who are friendly and engaging.  It has happens to be just a few blocks from where I attended junior high school.

Community has many definitions depending on the various contexts of our interactions with each other and where we are interacting with each other.  A big part of community is seeing the other person and being seen by another. Being seen is something we take for granted.  Last week, a man hid himself under the front of a public bus, which then dragged the man’s body nearly half a mile until coming to a stop.  This took place on the street where my office is located, right in front of my office window.  But I didn’t see it happen.  The bus driver obviously didn’t see the man, which ended in the man’s tragic death.  It seems that our ability to see one another is becoming increasingly more difficult.

WEEAD – Prevention of Elder Abuse Begins with Seeing Elders as a Contributing Part of Our Community

In our world, seeing is a precursor to engaging with the other.  Engagement can lead to effective participation.  Take a look at this link to The Road to Elder Justice Virtual Art Gallery with many beautiful expressions of what elders contribute.  On this WEEAD, events are scheduled in nearly every state to raise awareness.  Check out this event organized by the Boulder County Area Agency on Aging.  Here’s a link to a Facebook Live broadcast today at 5:00 p.m. MDT about how the Office of the Inspector General at the Social Security Administration detects and prevents suspected elder financial exploitation  and how people can protect themselves and others from mistreatment.

A question follows: what do we see about elder abuse and how do we see it?

One helpful resource has identified the beliefs about elder abuse as “the swamp:” which includes limiting beliefs (often mistaken for conventional wisdom…) such as:

modern life is the problem – we simply don’t care enough about older people so caregivers are pushed to the limit and older people are devalued;

there are not enough resources for any solutions – there is not enough money for prosecution and surveillance of perpetrators, or raising awareness and education about elder abuse to help recognize it or for providing support for caregivers and as a result, nothing can really be done;

the individuals affected are really the problem – perhaps these elders had it coming as payback, many older people are difficult to deal with or have personal weaknesses, the perpetrators are greedy, lazy, opportunistic, or bad people who cannot be deterred, and we’re either all responsible for it or no one is;

elder abuse is vaguely defined and hard to recognize for many people – elder abuse as such is not acceptable, but many forms of neglect don’t qualify as abuse, including sexual abuse of elder women.

This ”swamp” thinking described above is hardly “thinking”, as these represent only relatively common types of limiting beliefs like: universalizing a problem to inflate its significance and make “solving” it impossible; personalizing elder abuse to make it only about certain types of individuals who are affected; catastrophizing it so that the only “response” can be hand-wringing; and making unrealistic or false distinctions about what is acceptable behavior and what is not so as to make identification of the real problem impossible.

We Must Refuse to Accept That Elderhood is Only About Loss and Marginalization

Like the “swamp thinking” above, many of us have unexamined beliefs about what it means to be “old.”  These beliefs can reflect scarcity beliefs and thinking about the world each of us lives in.  Those beliefs can dictate what we see in elders and how their role in society is marginalized. In this respect, the marginalization of elders as a kind of “lesser than” or “has been” segment of our culture and economy becomes a kind of collective self-fulfilling prophecy.  Sociologist Robert K. Merton coined that phrase in 1948 with these terms:

The self-fulfilling prophecy is, in the beginning, a false definition of the situation evoking a new behavior which makes the original false conception come true. This specious validity of the self-fulfilling prophecy perpetuates a reign of error. For the prophet will cite the actual course of events as proof that he was right from the very beginning.

Looking at the relationship between our diminished expectations of what is possible in elderhood and what we expect to see, based on our expectations, generally leads to …  These expectations become the self-fulfilling prophecy, for ourselves and for others.  But, this challenge becomes an opportunity to change our perspective and change our minds.

There are good resources available that help us to reframe the story of elder abuse from one based on inevitable decline, vulnerability and victimhood to a story from a different perspective, reframed to tell of empowering ourselves and elders to engage with and participate in pro-social activities designed to strengthens the ties which already exist – instead of disowning them because of some of the difficulties we have come to experience.

I will write more about pro-social behaviors we can nurture and support to prevent elder abuse – as individuals and collectively.

© 2018 Barbara Cashman  www.DenverElderLaw.org

The Dead Girl Who Continues to Live

Death Upside Down

Four years ago I wrote a post entitled “When Death Is Not Death: Stumbling Over the Parameters of “Brain Dead” about brain death and other medical-intellectual curiosities.  Turns out that one of the young women whose “brain dead” status I described is still. . . not dead, er… rather alive.  Alive for some people, seems to mean “brain dead” for others!  I read with interest Rachel Aviv’s Feb. 5, 2018 New Yorker article  about Jahi McMath, the teenager who suffered complications from a December 9, 2013 tonsillectomy at an Oakland, California hospital.  Some of the story is about our “health care system” and its values – about whose life matters, what condition of life passes for death.  The biggest challenge I see for all of us and this predicament we find ourselves in with health care in this country – is the dogma of the medical-industrial complex and its insistence on getting everyone “in line” about what passes for death and training us to simply not question the information we are given by the professionals reading the diagnostic screens.

Acting “As If” Death Had a Clear Legal and Medical Definition

To the extent we privilege the measurement of brain activity as a measure of our consciousness, as an indicator of the proof of our existence, we deny the underlying philosophical problem of defining or delimiting life and death (and consciousness).  Our present obsession with the measurable quantification of our biological activities is a major component of our current health care system.  We love the pictures of our insides and their operations in “real time.”  As long as we continue to collectively pretend that one’s existence can be verified by a particular type of brain scan, we will remain in denial.

But that denial is often a safe place, based on the “safety in numbers” type of thinking and as a result of the unquestioned power that doctors have and wield over us with their technocratic medical delivery system.

The Audacity to Think – or Rather Believe – That Our Technology Alone Can Be Used as a Means of Extending Someone’s Life by Prolonging Rudimentary Bodily Functions.

I talk to many people who confuse life support with extending one’s life and also with prolonging the dying process.

How do we tell the difference?  Why, ask the doctors!

Can I be kept alive indefinitely against my will? I haven’t heard that question yet, but I suspect there are versions of it being asked.  I am not comfortable handing over my authority to a health care provider who refuses to consider (let alone struggle with) the bigger questions about life – and death.

At a fundamental level, Jahi McMath’s story is about her family members who simply refused to believe what they were being told by the doctors.

One of the neurologists who examined Jahi McMath was the recently retired chief of neurology at Olive View – UCLA Medical Center.  Dr. D. Alan Shewmon was no stranger to cases where patients – many of them children or youths, survived for months or years after being declared brain dead by the medical establishment.  You can read his 1997 article “Recovering from Brain Death: A Neurologist’s Apologia”   here.

No answers in this post, only questions.  How far does the death taboo extend to our thinking or believing (which are often indistinguishable) about what passes for life?  In our brain-obsessed culture that is fascinated with measurements and arriving at the quantifiable, where does the subjective and mysterious show up – or is it simply banished and its existence denied?

© 2018 Barbara Cashman  www.DenverElderLaw.org

Is Guardianship Reform Coming to Colorado?

One Stone of an Ancient Ring

I’m beginning a series of posts about guardianship reform and its relationship to elder abuse.

What is known as “guardianship reform” is a very hot topic these days.

On the local level, I noticed that a candidate for a Littleton City Council seat made a critical reference to the powers of the Adult Protective Services system to investigate the welfare of a local resident (who apparently has dementia) living in her own home.  In the national press, guardianship reform has received lots of attention.  For Colorado, we have had versions of the Uniform Law Commission’s Uniform Guardianship and Protective Proceedings in our probate code for quite some time.  You can review the User’s Manuals for Guardians and for Conservators in Colorado here.

The Uniform Guardianship, Conservatorship and Other Protective Arrangements Act

But there is a newer 2017 version of a uniform law which the Uniform Law Commissioners have prepared for adoption by the states.  It is known as the Uniform Guardianship, Conservatorship, and Other Protective Arrangements Act, or UGCOPAA.  You can read more about it here.  A sub-committee of the Trusts & Estates and Elder Law Sections of the Colorado Bar Association is presently reviewing its provisions to examine how its provisions would impact existing Colorado law (our code and case law pertaining to its provisions).  More about that later!

This post is the introduction to the series and so I ask the basic question:

What does guardianship reform have to do with elder abuse prevention?

Apparently, plenty!  Particularly if you happen to be the child of a celebrity whose stepmother acted as your father’s guardian and limited or prevented you from visiting your parent during the end of his life and while he was suffering from dementia. The connection came to me the other day in the form of a Google alert.  It cited to a recent article about Casey Kasem’s daughter Kerri, who had a dispute with Kasem’s wife about his care while suffering from Lewy body dementia as well as the disposition of his last remains.  Glen Campbell’s children also had difficulties with their stepmother and their effort resulted in a Tennessee law that will “protect elderly.”  This LA Times article is about Kerri Kasem teaming up with Catherine Falk to advocate for more restrictions on a guardian’s authority which would allow more family members and others the right to visit a person under a guardianship.

In coming posts, I will explore topics including:

  • The importance of making your fiduciary/care wishes known If you are part of a dysfunctional family;
  • Who and what are fiduciaries in the elder law and probate context and why have they become so controversial?
  • What are unlimited guardianships, limited guardianships and “other protective arrangements;”

As well as other topics that arise in this context.  So please stay tuned!

© 2017 Barbara Cashman  www.DenverElderLaw.org

 

Giving Tuesday – Consider Giving Some Time to an Isolated Elder

Make the Connection!

Today is Colorado Gives Day!

Otherwise known as Giving Tuesday, the day designed to spotlight opportunities for people to give to charitable causes.  The day seems to have come into existence when two organizations, the 92nd Street Y in New York City and the United Nations Foundation came together in October 2012, with the intention to set aside a day that was all about celebrating the generosity of giving, a great American tradition.   According to USA Today, Giving Tuesday raised $180 million in online donations.  That is nothing to sneeze at!

Donating Locally is Easy!

Here in Colorado, we’ve got our own website with over 2,000 nonprofits listed to receive donor’s contributions.  You can visit the website and find a good place for your donation to support if you’re at a loss about which type of charity you’d like to benefit.

Instead of highlighting the worthy nonprofits which serve low-income elders, I’m looking at Colorado Gives Day with a different goal in mind – to raise awareness about reaching out to socially isolated elders in our communities.  I’m not just talking about making contact with folks who reside in senior housing residences, assisted living or skilled nursing facilities, but also to those elders who are “gaining in place” in their own homes and face considerable social isolation based on a number of factors.

What About Donating Your Time?

One way to ease an isolated elder’s isolation and also solidify our own connections with community members we might never have otherwise met – is to volunteer our time – even if for a few short minutes or hours.

You can easily volunteer your time locally through a nonprofit like Metro Volunteers, who will match your skills with a nonprofit looking for someone with your skills.  Whether it is a board of directors position you seek, a mentoring opportunity with a youth, or serving food to people at a shelter – Metro Volunteers can assist.

But the focus of today’s post is about giving time to an elder who is isolated.

There are numerous article and research into the effects of loneliness on the elderly population.  One recent study concluded that loneliness is a significant public health concern among elders.  In addition to easing a potential source of suffering, the identification and targeting of interventions for lonely elders may significantly decrease physician visits and health care costs.

Decreasing an Elder’s Sense of Isolation Helps Prevent Elder Abuse

I’m reposting a link from an elder abuse prevention listserve I am part of, originally posted this morning by the Social Media Manager of the NYC Elder Abuse Center at Weill Cornell Medical College.  The holidays are difficult times for many of us.  She writes “During the holiday season, family gatherings are more commonplace. Older adults feel social isolation more acutely, yet crave the connection. This holiday season NYCEAC is asking our social media followers to commit to have a conversation with an older adult in their life during the month of December. We know everyone benefits from a connection, and improves the health of the community at large, too.” We’re calling our campaign Countering Isolation, or #CounteringIsolation.

Remember that this type of giving of our time to another who doesn’t have the physical, psychological, financial or emotional wherewithal to engage in the broader community is a good thing with many positive benefits for us,  Happy Giving Tuesday!

© Barbara E. Cashman 2017   www.DenverElderLaw.org

The Dreaded “O” Word and Aging Into Wisdom

Old

 

I recently attended an educational lunch program put on by a financial advisor at a restaurant downtown.  It was geared to attorneys and their retirement planning needs. Most of us in attendance were “old enough” to be planning for retirement already and we had a number of questions answered.  A latecomer to the program arrived after we had finished our lunch.  He proceeded to ask our host a question about a “hypothetical 75 year old” but I suspected this colleague’s age to be well in excess of 80 years.  What really struck me however, was his use of the expression “O word” as if to acknowledge some common implied cultural unwillingness to use the term “old” as if it were a pejorative term.  I was both puzzled and troubled by this use of the term which I had never heard before, let alone from the mouth of an octogenarian!

So maybe there’s more than a few of us who simply refuse to accept this aging thing that we do, but I insist that there is a bright future for wisdom in elderhood. . . Here’s a link to a New York Times article  from 2014 about the science (from a psychological perspective) of “older and wiser” and  a short article from last month in Psychology Today entitled “Are Older People Wiser?”

Wisdom is one of the very few positive stereotypes of elderhood, but it’s of course not necessarily true.  A passive aging focused on the denial of age and eventual death does not lead to a ripeness of wisdom in one’s elder years. The jury is still out on this “older and wiser” issue, but while elders’ brains generally slow down, an elder’s experience and knowledge can make up for the shortcomings in processing speed and distractibility.  But getting to elderhood requires one to accept and even embrace our aging, learn from experience and to grow one’s knowledge along the way.  If we’re busily engaged with denying our aging, resenting that we’re “not who we used to be,” then that wisdom piece will remain elusive because we are failing to come to terms with a most basic premise of this life: the length of a life is uncertain and all we truly have is the present.

So, what is wisdom?  I liked these two definitions found at the Collins dictionary:

Wisdom is the ability to use your experience and knowledge in order to make sensible decisions or judgments; and in American

the quality of being wise; power of judging rightly and following the soundest course of action, based on knowledge, experience, understanding, etc.; good judgment; sagacity

There is also the wisdom tradition, which is synonymous with Perennialism, defined in Wikipedia as “the idea that there is a perennial or mystic inner core to all religious or spiritual traditions, without the trappings, doctrinal literalism, sectarianism, and power structures that are associated with institutionalized religion.”

So I turn to a favorite classic of literature here, Aldous Huxley’s The Perennial Philosophy, finding particularly relevant his quote of Francois Fenelon (at 257 of the Harper Perennial Modern Classics edition) to the subject of wisdom as an outgrowth of embracing the aging process as part of our experience of our selves:

Faults will turn to good, provided we use then to our own humiliation, without slackening in the effort to correct ourselves.  Discouragement serves no possible purpose; it is simply the despair of wounded self-love.  The real way of profiting by the humiliation of one’s own faults is to face them in their true hideousness, without ceasing to hope in God, while hoping nothing from self.

If we can avoid becoming overwhelmed with the discouragement of old age and its changes to us and in us, perhaps we can exercise that sagacity referred to above.  There a number of resources in the wisdom of aging category, including the late Reb Zalman Schachter-Shalomi’s book From Age-ing to Sage-ing which led to the founding of the Sage-ing International organization, which hosts workshops, webinars, conferences and other forums for fostering “spiritual eldering.”  Their website states that moving from age-ing to sage-ing involves the following:

  1. Developing a willingness to deal with life completion and overcoming the desire to stay in denial of aging.
  2. Coming to terms with our mortality.
  3. Acquiring the skills for working on the inside by practicing journaling, meditation, imaginal exercises, and spiritual intimacy by creating safe and sacred space in dyads.
  4. Paying attention to our body, feelings, mind, and spirit, being guided by them and maintaining them in the right tone, mood, and attitude.
  5. Giving  a real hearing to the inner voices – allowing all the minorities within the whole person their witness.
  6. Beginning to do life repair:
  • in health
  • in practical matters with wills and testaments
  • in relationships and between generations
  • by reaching into the past and offering release and healing
  • through forgiveness work with release from vindictiveness
  • by finding the pearls in the anxious memories
  • 7. Doing the philosophical homework by raising questions about the purpose and the meaning of our lives.
  • 8. Serving as elders to others as guides, mentors, and agent of healing and reconciliation on behalf of the planet, the nation, and the family by being wisdom keepers.
  • 9. Preparing for a serene death and afterlife, furnishing our solitude with God.
  • 10. Doing this nobly in connectedness with the inner, actualized self,  already realized, individuated, and complete.This is a formidable list, but fortunately there is assistance in the Sage-ing community for these efforts.  There are also other excellent resources which may involve a bit less introspection and life review.Jane Barton (of Cardinal Life LLC), an excellent local speaker with whom I am acquainted, has a program she has entitled “The Journey of Aging.”  Part of her programming covers the denial of death and the aging process and how that unwillingness to engage with our mortality adversely impacts our present abilities to consciously and deliberately plan for our future.

© 2017 Barbara Cashman  www.DenverElderLaw.org

Are There Alternatives to Guardianship for an Elder with Dementia?

Abacus of Glass Beads

I’m taking a look at the alternatives to unrestricted or plenary guardianship as a result of reading my latest issue of the ABA’s Bifocal magazine, in which the ABA’s House of Delegates adopted Resolution 113, urging states and other legislatures to amend guardianship statutes to consider less restrictive alternative to unrestricted or plenary guardianships of incapacitated adults and to require consideration of putting into place decision making supports that would allow a person the right to supported decision making as an alternative to (or reason for termination of) guardianship of an adult. I found the topic thought-provoking, particularly in light of a recently approved uniform law which contains many references to supported decision making.

In Colorado, an Incapacitated adult is defined our Probate Code at C.R.S. §15-14-102(5) as one

who is unable to effectively receive or evaluate information or both or make or communicate decisions to such an extent that the individual lacks the ability to satisfy essential requirements for physical health, safety, or self-care, even with appropriate and reasonably available technological assistance.

The definition comes from the Uniform Guardianship and Protective Proceedings Act, or CUGPPA in Colorado.  Below I’ll take a brief look at a continuum of less restrictive alternatives to implement in the making of decisions for persons who may be or become incapacitated (but not necessarily determined to be such by a probate court in protective proceedings).

First, I’ll note that each of these aspects of functional capacity and incapacity implicate a person’s rights to self-determination.  Self-determination is a broad topic. The principle of self-determination is prominently enshrined in Article I of the Charter of the United Nations.  It remains a concern under international law due to the fact that there are peoples who are not necessarily represented by the nation in which they find themselves.  For an adult who suffers from a progressive condition or disease process that results in cognitive impairment, there really isn’t such a stretch here to say that a person with dementia is at risk of being “colonized” or have their rights self-determination effectively erased by a legal determination of incapacity.  Here I’m talking about self-determination in the medical, and personal preferences context (concerning levels of care or autonomy, as well as choice of the setting in which one lives). The UN Convention of the Rights of Persons With Disabilities (CRPD), also speaks about supported decision making and you can read more about it here.

The medical or health care POA

I’m focusing on the medical POA here because Colorado’s protective proceeding for a person’s property is known as a conservatorship.  A conservatorship is often not necessary if a person has made effective POA naming an agent and the relationship is working and not otherwise under threat from an interloper.  But. . .  keep in mind that sometimes a non-agent family member or friend can take advantage of a person more easily if there is no court-imposed protection of the person’s property. Ah, there’s that ugly head of patriarchal protection (in the form of parens patriae, the power of the state to act as guardian for those who are unable to protect or care for themselves) again!

Bottom line is that, when people (sometimes known as “patients”) make their wishes known in advance to family members or others and empower another to decide for them as the person’s agent in a MDPOA , that empowerment alone can often lead to better outcomes.  But the fact remains that many of us choose not to choose to name an agent. So what’s next? In Colorado there are also proxy decision makers, which we might consider as “de facto” decision makers under applicable Colorado law.  So, that brings us to the next item. . .

Supported decision making – an intermediate ground . . .  or no man’s land?

This item is specifically included in the newly minted 2017 version of the Uniform Law Commission’s UGPPA, er UGCPAA (Uniform Guardianship, Conservatorship and Other Protective Arrangements Act) at §101(13) where it is listed as one of the “less restrictive alternatives” to guardianship.   In the proposed UGCOPAA, supported decision making means “assistance from one or more persons of an individual’s choosing” (§102(13)); and is added to the end of the above stated definition of incapacity – to read “unable to effectively receive and evaluate information or make or communicate decisions, even with appropriate supportive services, technological assistance, or supported decision making” (§301(a)(1)(A)); is an appropriate consideration for a court visitor to include in the report (§304(d)(2)); for inclusion in the court’s order appointing a guardian (§310(a)(1)); as one of the rights retained by an otherwise incapacitated adult, to “be involved in health care decision making to the extent reasonably feasible. . .  (§311(a)(3)); and in other examples perhaps appropriate for a later blog post. . . .

What are some standards for supported decision making, which is related to “person centered” planning (now part of the Medicare rules, incidentally)?

This alternative sounds all well and good Barb, but what about those elders with dementia whose cognitive impairments are likely to worsen?  Is it realistic to devise a plan for this supported decision making?  After all, those folks are arguably in a situation different from developmentally disabled adults who may can live independently and working in the community, so long as there are community supports.  But I think this is a less restrictive alternative that is seriously underutilized due to the simple fact that people aren’t used to the idea and it is challenging to identify what it might entail and look like in an alternative to probate court protective proceedings or as part of a court’s order granting a limited or restricted guardianship.

Limited guardianship

This one is pretty self-explanatory.  Only certain identified matters are under the authority of a court-appointed guardian and the rest of the rights are reserved to or preserved in the “ward.”  The tricky part with this is an important detail – scarce judicial resources.  Most courts are not anxious to re-examine how supported decision making or a limited guardianship is working and re-tool it as needed.  Most courts have a difficult enough time simply monitoring those guardians!

Plenary or unrestricted guardianship

This is the norm in this country, regardless of lip service in statutes or case law concerning less restrictive alternatives.  But if we are to truly attempt to accomplish guardianship reform, we (courts, elder law attorneys, service providers and other resources) must work together to fashion a viable alternative to what has become the quick and dirty, default request in a guardianship proceeding involving an elder with dementia who may be in the future or already is “incapacitated.”  Stay tuned for more on this topic in the future.

© 2017 Barbara Cashman  www.DenverElderLaw.org

Financial Empowerment for Elders

The Mighty Tiber

I’m privileged to be the invited speaker for Denver City Councilwoman Kendra Black’s “Senior Series” program tomorrow morning on the topic “Financial Empowerment: Planning for Longevity.”  I hope it will be a lively Q & A session with the participants!

So what is this empowerment anyway? Merriam Webster’s online defines empower as:

transitive verb: (1) to give official authority or legal power to; (2) enable; and (3) to promote the self-actualization or influence of.

Empowerment has at least a couple layers here, but for my purposes in educating and assisting elders who are living longer and in greater number than ever before, the most important aspect is the “give legal power to” in the first definition.

What I’m thinking of are documents like durable powers of attorney – both medical and general (financial) as well as other documents like a living will, a disposition of last remains and other similar documents.

Modern estate planning traverses two different “time zones” if you will – both the longevity scenario which covers the incapacity and disability side of life among the living, particularly for a long life, as well as the other side of life, or what happens after someone passes away.  Empowerment can and does often involve both of these time zones, but it is critical that the first time zone be discussed and planned for because the longer we live, the greater our chances of being incapacitated (for short or longer term periods).  Empowerment here means a conversation not just about the inevitable (death) but also about what one’s preferences are in the event one cannot speak or communicate on their own.  But it also means enlisting support from our loved ones and friends, as well as our community, in the event we need help, support or protection.

That is a big part of what I will be addressing tomorrow.  The more we talk about these important matters, the easier the conversation becomes.  Some of these topics, like elder abuse and financial exploitation by adult children or caregivers, are still quite difficult to talk about – but they are necessary conversations!

I’ll be sure to share in a later post about what some of the participants concerns were and what we discussed.  In the meantime, I hope to see some of you at the Eisenhower Recreation Center (4300 East Dartmouth Ave., Denver) tomorrow at 10 a.m.!

© Barbara E. Cashman 2017   www.DenverElderLaw.org

 

The Eclipse and the End of Life As We Know It

True Illusion

The eclipse that is set to occur on Monday, August 21, 2017 is a big deal. I have several friends who are traveling to get a better view of this event.  One couple I know is going to Fort Laramie, Wyoming and other friends to McCook, Nebraska.  Here’s a handy map that shows the strip of total eclipse. Based on my research, the last coast to coast eclipse in the US was ninety-nine years ago.  I remember seeing a partial eclipse in Denver almost thirty years ago.  It was pretty cool.  So, if you want to “prepare” for this eclipse, go to this link on the NASA website.  After all, it’s set to last for nearly three hours, reaching its maximum at 11:47 a.m. in my neck of the woods.

So what is it about the eclipse that would cause me to couple it with. . . the end of life?!  Well, here goes.

The word eclipse comes from the Greek ekleipsis, which means abandonment, cessation, failing, omission or flaw.

But remember that the eclipse merely obscures the sun from our sight – the moon appearing before the sun to block it does not extinguish the sun, but from our eyesight-based superficial understanding of what we think we see. . . . well, what’s the difference?

It’s a matter of vision, not eyesight.

Perhaps we eclipse-seekers are simply in search of awe, what some of our forebears would call miracles. Where should we search – in the familiar places or the unfamiliar, even uncomfortable ones? That’s hard to say. Few of us look for that awe in the mundane and everyday, but that is almost always where it seems to be found, discovered, seen.

This awe can cause a cognitive shift in our awareness, as in the “overview effect.” The term was first coined by Frank White in his 1987 book The Overview Effect — Space Exploration and Human Evolution and is described in this Wikipedia entry as

the experience of seeing firsthand the reality of the Earth in space, which is immediately understood to be a tiny, fragile ball of life, “hanging in the void”, shielded and nourished by a paper-thin atmosphere. From space, national boundaries vanish, the conflicts that divide people become less important, and the need to create a planetary society with the united will to protect this “pale blue dot” becomes both obvious and imperative.

It strikes me that this eclipse, and its draw to our experience of life, is not unlike the awe at the end of life. The drawing and that movement is perhaps generated in different directions so to speak. We can “attend” the eclipse and experience it in ways we enjoy, but the end of our life demands a different kind of presence – one no less awe-some, one that we may think we are not quite ready to experience.

In his book Places of the Heart: The Psychogeography of Everyday Life, Colin Ellard looks at places of awe.  At 154 of the book he looks at research into experiences of awe which focus on two essential aspects: a feeling of vastness and a sense of accommodation.  Vastness is the feeling of hugeness and grandeur, while accommodation describes our response to what created the feeling.  Ellard notes this often involves contradiction. An excellent article on awe (and its self-diminishing aspects) and prosocial behavior can be found here.

What is the inevitable here? We can easily face and even celebrate the inevitable when it is. . . . not too close and personal!  But what of dying and how can we recognize it as it approaches and obscures our sight ? Most of us don’t want to see death coming, so we turn away!

When people refuse to have the conversation about dying and its uncertain circumstances, to name or appoint someone to speak for them in the event they are unable to do so on their own, well – then the doctors will decide for you.  Here’s an interview with Dr. Jessica Zitter, ICU and palliative care doc and author of Extreme Measure, a book about the ethics of end of life medicine. Thanks for sharing that with me Georgine!

So maybe there is some preparing we can do for the eclipse(s) of our life. . . .   I think these Buddhist sayings (dhammas) sum up this essential changeable quality of our nature and that of the cosmos most succinctly:

I am of the nature to decay, I have not gone beyond decay.
I am of the nature to be diseased, I have not gone beyond disease.
I am of the nature to die, I have not gone beyond death.
All that is mine, dear and delightful, will change and vanish.

It’s a hard place to just be, to be with the uncertainty – will there be a sun that returns after the moon passes over it completely?

The eclipse of –  disease, misfortune, old age, fear of change, death.

Perhaps we can see this eclipse opportunity as an invitation, a path, to assist us in recalling how to revere, to feel deep respect or awe for something, for our relationship with the world and with each other.  In this respect, we remember reverence through nature – our nature – not outside, but inside each of us.

© 2017 Barbara Cashman  www.DenverElderLaw.org

Denver Senior Law Day is Tomorrow!

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Yep, Denver’s Senior Law Day is Saturday, July 29, 2017 at the PPA Event Center, 2105 Decatur Street, Denver, CO 80211.  You can register by emailing SLD@DenverProbateLaw.com or by calling 303.757.4342.  The cost is $10 and you get to hear the speakers, eat snacks and take home a copy of the 2017 Senior Law Handbook!

The opening presentation starts at 8:15 a.m., and features Maro Casparian, Director of Consumer Protection at the Denver District Attorney’s office, as well as other attorneys who will present on a number of elder law and independent living topics.

I will be co-presenting with my esteemed colleague M. Carl Glatstein from 11:15 a.m. – 12:00 on the topic of Advance Directives, the End of Life Options Act and Guardianship.  That’s quite the trifecta if you ask me! In particular I will be speaking about the End of Life Options (EoLOA) Act and will also have a bit to say about how the new law meshes with advance directives (like medical powers of attorney and living wills) as well as guardianship proceedings.

That’s all for this post!

Capacity and Incapacity in Context

Maigue Swan

 

Capacity is not some dusty old legal concept! In this post I revisit some implications encroaching incapacity or. . .  the “dark side” of our longevity.

The issue of capacity basically concerns judgement – the ability to reflect on and consider decisions required for daily living.  When one lacks that capacity (or is deprived of it) the validity of some actions taken or decisions made – which have legal implications – can be called into question.  This capacity discussion is likely to become more commonplace as more baby boomers move into retirement years and greater longevity…

Here’s a definition of capacity referring to Black’s Law Dictionary:

Legal capacity is the attribute of a person who can acquire new rights, or transfer rights, or assume duties, according to the mere dictates of his own will, as manifested in juristic acts, without any restraint or hindrance arising from his status or legal condition. Ability; qualification; legal power or right. Applied in this sense to the attribute of persons (natural or artificial) growing out of their status or juristic condition, which enables them to perform civil acts; as capacity to hold lands, capacity to devise, etc.

Capacity includes the ability to behave rationally and exercise one’s own judgment (for better or worse).  Certain matters which typically adversely impact one’s otherwise presumably intact capacity include: mental disorder, developmental disability, intoxication, injury affecting one’s cognitive abilities, or the course of a disease process.

Reference to judgement capacity (or the ability to process information) is a legal notion often coupled with or inclusive of a functional (objective) capacity assessment.  This is because so many of our human “doings” can require distinguishing (as our law does) between when we can manage and when we can’t.  The term “capacity” by nature refers to an ability.  I won’t go into any discussion about the nuances and historical underpinnings in the law relating to capacity as distinguished from competence.  If you want to read further on that topic, check out this entry from the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy on decision-making capacity.

So – how do we move from being presumed to have capacity to being legally incapacitated?

Where an adult has diminished or diminishing capacity, the law makes reference here to the “least restrictive means,” a concept borrowed from disability law.  For Colorado adults who are determined by a court to be incapacitated, there is a finding by the court that “the ward is an incapacitated person and the ward’s needs cannot be met by less restrictive means, including the use of appropriate and reasonably available technological assistance.”  See JDF 848, Order Appointing Guardian for Adult.

Because my practice focuses on elder law and probate, most of the petitioners whom I represent file petitions for guardianship (or conservatorship) concerning elders who have “slipped” in their capacities to manage for themselves, meaning the individual no longer has sufficient capacity to manage their affairs or make important decisions on their own.  Many of these elders are at risk of financial exploitation as a result.  I have also represented petitioners who are often parents of developmentally disabled young adults.  The distinctions among them, as for elders, are varied and numerous.  Suffice it to say that sometimes, for younger adults, it may be easier to establish grounds for a limited – as distinguished from the much more commonplace unlimited guardianship.  In the former there can be specific references to supports to help facilitate an adult’s capacity(ies).  Unfortunately, limited guardianships remain rare birds for a number of different reasons.

  Capacity in Daily Living

To bring this discussion back to the practical level, I not that one’s capacity to “live independently” or perform the activities of daily living (ADLs) are often part of the incapacity picture as well, but this is generally due to a concern for an elder’s self-neglect.  With regard to an elder who is named as a respondent in a petition for guardianship, the elder’s physical capacity or incapacity is generally irrelevant in determining incapacity unless it substantially affects his or her ability to make or communicate important decisions regarding his or her person, family, property, or results in self-neglect.  Physical impairments alone are often of limited import in the guardianship context, as evidenced by reference in Colorado law assistive devices and technologies and the preference for least restrictive means, but in making the determination of incapacity, reference is made (as stated above in JDF 848)  to those assistive technologies.

Another context for elders and capacity which is receiving more attention is the issue of consent for sexual relations.  I would imagine that the free-loving baby boomers will test their adult children’s tolerance and demand that more attention be paid to this aspect of living in a communal or institutionalized setting. Read a recent study about the generation gap in attitudes and practices of extramarital sex here.  A couple years back I wrote a blogpost on this topic and also about a husband in Iowa who was prosecuted for allegedly sexually abusing his demented wife.

Suffice it to say that this debate is ongoing, particularly as more institutions look to provide more person-centered care for residents who still enjoy physical intimacy.  Some of these folks have dementia or other cognitive impairments which can affect their ability to consent.  Do not underestimate the “eeewww” factor of many of these folks’ adult children who would rather not be informed of mom’s recently contracted STD or consider that an elder parent is sexually active!

We must remember, even when an adult is determined to be incapacitated for purposes of imposing a guardianship, what can still remain intact is that person’s capacity to express a preference as to the person who will serve as guardian.  In In re Estate of Runyon, 343 p.3d 1072, 1077 (Colo.App.Div.4 2014), the court held that

a finding that the respondent is an “incapacitated person” within the terms of the statute does not necessarily mean that the respondent lacks sufficient capacity to express a preference as to a guardian or conservator.   Neither the definition of incapacitated person nor the criteria for appointment of a conservator automatically exclude the ability to make a rational choice as to the selection of a guardian or conservator. Therefore, an incapacitated person may “still be able to express an intelligent view as to his choice of guardian, which view is entitled to consideration by the court. (Citations omitted)

That’s all for now and thanks for reading!

© Barbara E. Cashman 2017   www.DenverElderLaw.org