Planning for Aging

Florentine graffiti… what me worry?

How does one assess the value of planning for one’s retirement, potential incapacity and/or eventual demise?  That is a very personal assessment, notwithstanding that the failure to plan has enormous financial consequences – for the individual, their loved ones and society as a whole.  Perhaps a prime and popular example is the failure to make advance heath directives – including appointing an agent under a health care power of attorney and signing a statement of end of life wishes – a/k/a a living will or in Colorado the Declaration as to Medical Treatment.  Read here for more useful information from the Colorado Advance Directives Consortium.  Many of us, perhaps most, would rather not entertain the idea that our lives will eventually change.  Our lives change every day, but whether we mark those changes is up to us!

“In the beginning is relation”

This famous quote by philosopher and theologian Martin Buber is a favorite of mine.  In my line of work relation and relationships are keys to planning and realistically assessing how far one can plan as well as the extent to which we must rely on others to assist us in the execution of our planning.

Aging and planning can give us the space to reflect on our values, what has been and remains important to us, and planning can also take much of the burden off our loved ones in the event we face a health crisis during we might be unable to make decisions.

I recently came across Sharona Hoffman’s 2015 book “Aging With a Plan,” and found it very insightful.  Hoffman is a law professor and, like many of us who practice in elder law, has life experience with an aging and frail parent.  She uses that experience, along with a systematic big picture discussion of a realistic conversation to consider all the alternatives in making plans for one’s aged self.

Many of us assume that, if we have lived in our home independently for 30+, we would never have an intention of leaving that space of storied independence and autonomy.  I note here that many elders (I’m including a number of clients and others) are coming to understand that there are good and workable alternative options for housing and community involvement that can nourish and sustain one’s basic human need to be part of a community and to contribute to that community.

I liked Hoffman’s approach to her book because it is founded on the importance of maintaining relationships, through social interaction and being useful (at whatever level).  The latter, being useful and having something or someone to take care of, is a fundamental premise in the “green house” nursing home alternative.  You can read about that in an article here from the Atlantic Monthly, or more about Dr.  Bill Thomas in a 2016 Washington Post article.  But I don’t want to get off track in talking about “green houses”  . . . .

So what are the components of a plan for aging? We are all familiar with retirement planning (even if the majority of us barely engage in such planning) and its focus on finances.  I think part of the repulsion in retirement planning is the focus on finances, many people simply find the savings part a difficult conversation and so stop before considering other aspects of retirement planning or aging with a plan.  I consider neither of these often heard comments a plan:  “X will never happen to me because my family doesn’t live that long;” or “if I can’t go to the bathroom or feed myself on my own, then just shoot me.”  We still don’t understand the role of genetics and epigenetics on the aging process very well and not deciding this very grown-up matter of “what happens if” means that we are shirking the responsibility be forcing someone else to choose for us…..

I recommend Hoffman’s book – it’s easy to read and its focus on several practical concerns including: finances; elders driving; person-centered (not disease-based) health care; and the importance of an exit strategy; demonstrate that the book is very useful – for an elder or elder-in training, or for an elder’s family member to assist with the awkward place of overcoming years of inertia.

© Barbara E. Cashman 2017   www.DenverElderLaw.org

Caregiving is Not for Sissies!

Sideways Sky

 

In my latest issue of Bifocal, the bi-monthly publication of the American Bar Association’s Commission on Aging, I noticed a helpful new resource entitled Ten Legal Tips for Caregivers. Here’s a link to the document.  In case you’re wondering who that “typical” family caregiver is, a recent New York Times article written by a resident physician, identified her as

a 49-year-old woman caring for an older relative — but nearly a quarter of caregivers are now millennials and are equally likely to be male or female. About one-third of caregivers have a full-time job, and 25 percent work part time. A third provide more than 21 hours of care per week. Family caregivers are, of course, generally unpaid, but the economic value of their care is estimated at $470 billion a year — roughly the annual American spending on Medicaid.

The comments section of this NYT article is both telling and heart wrenching, as there are so many stories of people who recount many of the article’s observations that this massive group of volunteer caregivers put themselves at risk in ways from which it may be difficult to recover.  There is the great financial risk, cutting back on work in order to care for an elder parent.  This financial strain is measurable but probably the more disturbing numbers comes from other studies concerning the lingering health effects (like depression, anxiety and chronic disease) of extended caregiving.  A JAMA article from 1999 entitled “Caregiving as a Risk Factor for Mortality: The Caregiver Health Effects Study” quantify the heightened mortality rates of caregivers.

So, enough of this gloom and doom, eh? Don’t let me get started on how this volunteer army’s numbers will be forced to multiply dramatically in the event the Affordable Care Act, with its Medicaid expansion services which many seniors now enjoy, is repealed.  Considerable portions of the Medicaid programs for elders will likely simply disappear under the block grants which could replace the ACA’s funding of these programs, which has taken several years to put in place.   Changes to Medicare from the proposed legislation known as the AHCA could compromise Medicare’s viability in a shorter time frame. That’s another blog post!

Olay, so what steps can a caregiver take to protect themselves legally?  The tip sheet identifies ten different steps or competencies which the caregiver can utilize to better assist the elder for whom they provide care as well as to protect themselves:

  1. Understand decisional capacity
  2. Know what legal authority you have
  3. Appoint a health care agent
  4. Complete a financial power of attorney
  5. Manage Social Security/ Veteran’s benefits
  6. Know your rights of access to health care information
  7. Know the signs of abuse, neglect and exploitation
  8. Know your rights if you face Family Responsibilities Discrimination (a form of employment discrimination)
  9. Understand your rights under the Family and Medical Leave Act (federal legislation)
  10. Consider a Personal Care Agreement (to counteract some of the financial losses described above)

This tip sheet, like other public resources made available by the American Bar Association, contains useful and helpful information.  It is a welcome reminder for caregivers that they should not wait until a health crisis to figure out the basics of how best to provide care for their elder.  Making advance care arrangements and learning more about how to manage information and choices for another (using durable powers of attorney) can help take some of the anxiety out of the “what if’s” so many caregivers face on a regular basis.  Turns out that taking care of the caregiver allows for better care to be provided for the elder who needs care.  That’s all for now!

© 2017 Barbara Cashman  www.DenverElderLaw.org