Medicare and the Midterm Elections?

On the threshold

The Future of Medicare as We Know It Will Be Affected by This Election

Medicare is the federal health insurance program for people who are 65 and older and a small group of other folks.  It consists of several parts: Part A (Hospital Insurance), Part B (Medical Insurance, which covers doctors’ services, outpatient care, home health services, and other medical services), and Part D (which covers outpatient prescription drugs).  The Congressional Budget Office states that

Nearly all Medicare beneficiaries enroll in the program soon after they become eligible, typically either at age 65 or two years after they qualify for Social Security Disability Insurance benefits. Part A benefits are paid from the Hospital Insurance Trust Fund (funded largely through payroll taxes); Part B and Part D benefits are paid from the Supplementary Medical Insurance Trust Fund (about 25 percent funded by premiums paid by enrollees and about 75 percent funded from general revenues).

I know of baby boomers who aren’t yet able to retire and qualify for Medicare who put off major medical care (to the extent is feasible) until they are covered by Medicare.  Medicare, such that it is, is a bright spot for most Americans who are retired.  But things are changing!

But Medicare may be under attack – at least according to Save Medicare Now,  whose website* lists these good questions to ask our elected officials and candidates:

•What specific steps will you take to preserve and strengthen Medicare for all beneficiaries, whether they are in traditional Medicare or a Medicare Advantage plan?

• How will you make Medicare more affordable for all the people who rely on it to make sure they get access to the care they need?

• Will you fight attempts to privatize Medicare by unfairly favoring private Medicare Advantage plans and/or by turning it over to big insurance companies?

• Medicare is a popular program, but there are significant gaps in what it covers, including most oral health, vision and hearing care. Do you think Medicare should cover these things? If so, how do we get there?

• Most people want to remain in their own homes as long as possible, but Medicare makes it hard for people with chronic conditions and longer-term illnesses to get home health care. Will you help ensure that all people who qualify can get home health care under Medicare?

• Some hospitals pretend people haven’t been formally “admitted” and are just “under observation” so they must pay out-of-pocket for nursing home care after they leave. Would you support pending legislation that would count all time a Medicare patient spends in the hospital toward the 3-day requirement to get nursing home coverage? What about removing the requirement altogether?

• At best you can generally get only 100 days of nursing home coverage if you are on Medicare. Do you think Medicare should include a long-term care benefit? If so, how would you accomplish that?

What Can We Do About Our Ever-Rising Health Care Costs?

This seems to have become something we all expect – that health care costs continue to rise in this country and as the baby boomers age, and these result in greater per capita costs to Medicare.  Did you know that the Affordable Care Act helped to reduce Medicare spending?  Remember all those tax cuts from earlier this year?  Many of the people left behind on those tax breaks are going to start feeling the pinch soon. The midterm elections may determine whether our elected officials in Washington choose to strengthen Medicare or to gut it.

If this is news to you, consider that cutting Medicare is one way that some members of Congress would manage the deficit.  This is an interesting development, particularly considering that a “Medicare for all” options is becoming more popular, even among Republicans.

Hmmm…. Maybe we need a health care revolution to stop our bleeding?

I often wonder when the credit agencies will start asking folks not what their monthly rent or mortgage payment is but rather what their monthly health insurance premium is!  My monthly premium for my HSA qualified plan (among the cheapest available) continues to rise and for the last couple years it is larger than my mortgage payment!

That’s all for now and don’t forget to return your ballots on time!

*Thanks to Professor Rebecca Morgan, a contributor to ElderLawProfBlog for psoting about the Center for Medicare Advocacy’s  website Save Medicare Now changes to Medicare.

©2018 Barbara E. Cashman, www.DenverElderLaw.org

 

 

Memento Mori: Bringing Death Into Conversation

Memento Mori – from Kirkwall, Orkney Islands

Memento Mori: Remember Death, That You Will Die

Last weekend I attended the International Death Symposium in Toronto, Canada. I went with a friend who is a Canadian death midwife.  We both enjoyed it. It was a rather extraordinary place to be, amidst an entire community of folks committed to dispelling the death taboo.  The presenters and attendees were Canadians mostly, some Americans and an Irishman who spoke eloquently about his father’s death and wake.

So, what is conversation anyway?

Definition of Conversation

1 obsolete : CONDUCT, BEHAVIOR

2a(1) : oral exchange of sentiments, observations, opinions, or ideas

… we had talk enough but no conversation; there was nothing discussed.

—Samuel Johnson

(2) : an instance of such exchange : TALK; a quiet conversation.

Of course, I couldn’t mention “conversation” without a reference to The Conversation Project, which is a very useful tool to help people (like many of my clients) toalk about the end of their lives and express their wishes and values around that part of life.

In this post, I’ll share a couple highlights from the symposium. One of the “rocks stars” who presented was BJ Miller, a hospice doctor from San Francisco.  You can watch a video here about the “problem of death” in our medical delivery system.  Part of his presentation at the Symposium addressed the conflict of aesthetics of caring for the dying and the widespread use of anesthesia.

Aesthetic versus Anaesthetic

My late mother, an R.N. who received her nurse’s training through the Nurse Cadet Corps, would have been thrilled to hear an M.D. make reference to the work of a nurse.  The nurse was none other than Florence Nightingale, the “mother of nursing,” who wrote about the aesthetics of caring for patients.  Miller contrasted Nightingale’s insistence on aesthetics – a set of principles concerned with the nature and appreciation of beauty – with the current widespread use of anaesthesia (or anesthesia in the US) which is the numbing or rejection of aesthetics in favor of

Insensitivity to pain, especially as artificially induced by the administration of gases or the injection of drugs

In this place of intersection between our ability to sense and perceive beauty with the selfsame capacity to sense pain, what do we make of our commonly accepted and pervasive use of drugs in this country (and so much of the west) to numb us down to “ease our suffering” regardless of where in our lives we encounter that suffering?  It could be at the end of our life, somewhere in-between for a surgical procedure, or it could become a lifestyle treatment for anxiety and depression.  Does it matter where the suffering occurs for which we seek anesthesia?

Our Sense or Capacity to Appreciate the Beautiful is Inextricably Linked to Our Capacity to Feel Pain

Isn’t the pain of dying just the pain of living at a time of greater uncertainty?  Why do we pretend we can draw the distinction so clearly –  particularly during a time of unprecedented numbers of people dying of drug overdoses?  I’m not talking about the present opioid crisis – a recent study has shown that our current opioid overdose epidemic actually began forty years ago and has been increasing – exponentially – since then!

How and why we distinguish between the pain of living and the pain of dying . . .  well, that’s a topic for another blog post!

I’ll write more soon about the Symposium.

I’ll close with Emily Dickinson’s Because I Could Not Stop For Death

Because I could not stop for Death –

He kindly stopped for me –

The Carriage held but just Ourselves –

And Immortality.

 

We slowly drove – He knew no haste

And I had put away

My labor and my leisure too,

For His Civility –

 

We passed the School, where Children strove

At Recess – in the Ring –

We passed the Fields of Gazing Grain –

We passed the Setting Sun –

 

Or rather – He passed us –

The Dews drew quivering and chill –

For only Gossamer, my Gown –

My Tippet – only Tulle –

 

We paused before a House that seemed

A Swelling of the Ground –

The Roof was scarcely visible –

The Cornice – in the Ground –

 

Since then – ‘tis Centuries – and yet

Feels shorter than the Day

I first surmised the Horses’ Heads

Were toward Eternity –

From The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson, Thomas Johnson, ed.

That’s all for now, next time I’ll post about the Phone of the Wind, a.k.a Kaze No Denwa

© 2018 Barbara Cashman  www.DenverElderLaw.org

More about Preventing Elder Abuse With Prosocial Behaviors

Who You Callin’ Stubborn?

 

This is a follow-up post about WEAAD.  Elder abuse is a phenomenon that affects not just the victim of abuse, but threatens the fabric of our community.  Besides mandatory reporting, prosecuting perpetrators and enforcing existing laws prohibiting elder abuse and exploitation, there are prosocial behaviors which can serve as powerful and effective preventive interventions to guard against the isolation and vulnerability which often lead to elder abuse.

What Are Some Examples of Prosocial Behaviors?

The term was coined as an antonym of the more prevalent term “anti-social” behavior.  It comes in many different theoretical forms, but they all recognize that we humans are social beings and depend upon one another, notwithstanding many of our “atomistic” beliefs about who we are and how we interact with each other.  In this respect, prosocial behavior is tied to our very survival, but a functional approach is what I’m concerned about here because I’m looking at ways to foster elders remaining visible members of our community.  The basic behviors might include: demonstrating concern for others, sharing time and resources, caring for others and active empathy.

Isolation as a Precursor to Elder Abuse, Inclusion as the Antidote

It may not occur to many of us that someone’s ability to live independently in the home – a/k/a aging in place, can have disadvantages and drawbacks.  From my experience, I see plenty – but don’t get me wrong, I am definitely not against aging in place!  I am concerned that sometimes it gets glamorized in unhelpful ways.  I have seen some elders dig in their heels at the suggestion by loved ones that they bring in some help to perform household chores or share in meal preparation.  In its worst expression, it becomes a vow by the elder that they will only be removed from their home “on a gurney.”

How Our Focus on a Rights-Based Approach to Elderhood Often Overlooks the Prosocial Activities of Inclusion and Participation

Most elder abuse occurs in the home.  Many elders face abuse and abusive situations in skilled nursing facilities or other facilities and these tend to be the attention grabbers.  I think of this fact when I read the ruling on appeal issued by the U.S. Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals last May, which upheld a jury verdict of $1.21 million in damages against an operator of an Oklahoma City, Oklahoma nursing home for abuse of one of its residents by nursing home employees. Keep in mind that nursing home administrators have many resources to assist them in training and supervising staff, one of these tools is known as TPAAN and here’s more information about it.

Our Collective Fear of Dementia Often Means We Shun People Affected by Dementia

When we’re talking about elders aging in place, we have to consider folks with dementia.  People with dementia have trouble thinking and sometimes their loved ones in particular (most of whom have no special training in communicating with people with dementia) or other community members have a difficult time not correcting those errors in thinking, cognition or memory impairment.  But what if we looked at those “errors” not as errors but simply as a different way of being in the world?  How could we get through to see and listen to someone in that different world the person with dementia inhabits?  Remember, there is still much opportunity for communication, which can and does still happen.  The more challenging question is how we can facilitate it.  I think of music and its use in Alive Inside and I recently learned from a Canadian friend of the Butterfly Model, a new version of person-centered care that recognizes that

for people experiencing dementia, feelings matter most, that emotional intelligence is the core competency and that “people living with a dementia can thrive well in a nurturing environment where those living and working together know how to “be” person centered together”

We Can Still Be in Relation With A Person Whom We Struggle to Understand

This person-centered care is a relational way of engaging with a person affected by dementia. It also reminds me of Naomi Feil’s validation therapy, which is also relational.  So, this leads me to the inevitable question, can people engage in this type of relational work without specific training and/or outside the context of institutionalized care?  I will write more about this soon….

©2018 Barbara E. Cashman, www.DenverElderLaw.org

Observing World Elder Abuse Awareness Day, June 15, 2018

A Wee Highland coo…

WEEAD is Friday! If you want to show support in social media for this day, try this Thunderclap link to add your voice.  I write this post after a move to a new office, which is comfortable and spacious, where I am nestled amidst tenants who are friendly and engaging.  It has happens to be just a few blocks from where I attended junior high school.

Community has many definitions depending on the various contexts of our interactions with each other and where we are interacting with each other.  A big part of community is seeing the other person and being seen by another. Being seen is something we take for granted.  Last week, a man hid himself under the front of a public bus, which then dragged the man’s body nearly half a mile until coming to a stop.  This took place on the street where my office is located, right in front of my office window.  But I didn’t see it happen.  The bus driver obviously didn’t see the man, which ended in the man’s tragic death.  It seems that our ability to see one another is becoming increasingly more difficult.

WEEAD – Prevention of Elder Abuse Begins with Seeing Elders as a Contributing Part of Our Community

In our world, seeing is a precursor to engaging with the other.  Engagement can lead to effective participation.  Take a look at this link to The Road to Elder Justice Virtual Art Gallery with many beautiful expressions of what elders contribute.  On this WEEAD, events are scheduled in nearly every state to raise awareness.  Check out this event organized by the Boulder County Area Agency on Aging.  Here’s a link to a Facebook Live broadcast today at 5:00 p.m. MDT about how the Office of the Inspector General at the Social Security Administration detects and prevents suspected elder financial exploitation  and how people can protect themselves and others from mistreatment.

A question follows: what do we see about elder abuse and how do we see it?

One helpful resource has identified the beliefs about elder abuse as “the swamp:” which includes limiting beliefs (often mistaken for conventional wisdom…) such as:

modern life is the problem – we simply don’t care enough about older people so caregivers are pushed to the limit and older people are devalued;

there are not enough resources for any solutions – there is not enough money for prosecution and surveillance of perpetrators, or raising awareness and education about elder abuse to help recognize it or for providing support for caregivers and as a result, nothing can really be done;

the individuals affected are really the problem – perhaps these elders had it coming as payback, many older people are difficult to deal with or have personal weaknesses, the perpetrators are greedy, lazy, opportunistic, or bad people who cannot be deterred, and we’re either all responsible for it or no one is;

elder abuse is vaguely defined and hard to recognize for many people – elder abuse as such is not acceptable, but many forms of neglect don’t qualify as abuse, including sexual abuse of elder women.

This ”swamp” thinking described above is hardly “thinking”, as these represent only relatively common types of limiting beliefs like: universalizing a problem to inflate its significance and make “solving” it impossible; personalizing elder abuse to make it only about certain types of individuals who are affected; catastrophizing it so that the only “response” can be hand-wringing; and making unrealistic or false distinctions about what is acceptable behavior and what is not so as to make identification of the real problem impossible.

We Must Refuse to Accept That Elderhood is Only About Loss and Marginalization

Like the “swamp thinking” above, many of us have unexamined beliefs about what it means to be “old.”  These beliefs can reflect scarcity beliefs and thinking about the world each of us lives in.  Those beliefs can dictate what we see in elders and how their role in society is marginalized. In this respect, the marginalization of elders as a kind of “lesser than” or “has been” segment of our culture and economy becomes a kind of collective self-fulfilling prophecy.  Sociologist Robert K. Merton coined that phrase in 1948 with these terms:

The self-fulfilling prophecy is, in the beginning, a false definition of the situation evoking a new behavior which makes the original false conception come true. This specious validity of the self-fulfilling prophecy perpetuates a reign of error. For the prophet will cite the actual course of events as proof that he was right from the very beginning.

Looking at the relationship between our diminished expectations of what is possible in elderhood and what we expect to see, based on our expectations, generally leads to …  These expectations become the self-fulfilling prophecy, for ourselves and for others.  But, this challenge becomes an opportunity to change our perspective and change our minds.

There are good resources available that help us to reframe the story of elder abuse from one based on inevitable decline, vulnerability and victimhood to a story from a different perspective, reframed to tell of empowering ourselves and elders to engage with and participate in pro-social activities designed to strengthens the ties which already exist – instead of disowning them because of some of the difficulties we have come to experience.

I will write more about pro-social behaviors we can nurture and support to prevent elder abuse – as individuals and collectively.

© 2018 Barbara Cashman  www.DenverElderLaw.org

Elder Veterans and Elder Abuse

prevent abuse of elder veteran

ROTC picture of my Dad, who became an officer of the U.S. Army Air Corps

In observance of this Veteran’s Day, November 11, 2017, I wanted to share a blog post on this topic as well as some valuable resources.

“Boots on the Ground” to Prevent Exploitation of Elder Veterans

I want to begin with a shout-out for: Boots on the Ground – Fighting Financial Abuse of Elder Veterans by Tamari Hedani, Associate Director of the Elder Abuse Prevention Program at the Institute on Aging.

Fraudsters and Scammers Often Specialize in Particular Target Communities

Financial predators often “specialize” in identifying their victims by targeting specific populations and communities.  We know this is true for elder veterans.   I recently read an article about the “ghost scam” in New York City, where elder Chinese immigrants have been victimized by well-organized groups of scammers looking to take advantage of a common language and cultural ties for the purpose of stealing money from the immigrants.

Some People Who Claim to Be Offering Assistance to Elder Veterans Are Looking to Take Advantage of Them

There is an unfortunate variety of elder financial exploitation among the community of elder veterans.  Keep in mind that it is against the law to charge veterans or their families to fill out paperwork for the purposes of applying for benefits, and veterans and their friends and family members need to be reminded of this.  There are firms who do attempt to charge money for these services, and they should be reported, along with any kind of suspected fraud.

Fraud against veterans can involve variations on an old scam and involve bad advice concerning eligibility and result in financial windfalls for the seller of annuities or insurance.  The AARP warns in a recent post of four types of scams: the “cash for benefits” scheme; the “update your military file” scam; charity scams involving money for sick  or disabled veterans; and the “Veterans Choice Program” scam.  but worse yet are the pension poaching scams and other financial abuse of elder veterans.  Here is helpful information  from the Center on Elder Abuse about what a retired veteran needs to know before assets are transferred in order to qualify for benefits.

Whether Elder Veterans Are Aging in Place at Home or Living in Communal Settings, Important Resources Are Available to Assist in Detecting and Reporting Suspected Abuse or Exploitation

On the topic of benefits, the Veterans Health Administration (part of the Department of Veterans Affairs) and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services developed the Veteran Directed Home and Community Based Services program to provide wider choices concerning long-term care services and living at home as long as possible.

Elder veterans and their loved ones have resources available to assist them in detecting and reporting elder exploitation and abuse.  This flyer from the US Department of Justice’s Elder Justice Initiative contains phone numbers for immediate assistance and other helpful contact information for veterans.

© 2017 Barbara Cashman  www.DenverElderLaw.org

Elder Abuse Detection: the Vital Role of the Physician

Flowers in Stone

Colorado physicians are mandatory reporters under the Colorado elder abuse statute.  See Colo. Rev. Stat. §18-6.5-108(1)(a) – (1)(b).

There is typically a lot of shame and guilt around abuse or exploitation with an elder victim, particularly when the abuse is perpetrated by an adult child or family member of the elder and the elder may be reluctant to take any protective action on their own.  The elder often suffers alone and in silence and will sometimes neglect themselves as a result.  Remember that we don’t really have any firm grasp on how rampant elder abuse or exploitation is in our country due a number of factors which include: the reluctance of a victim to self-report; the variety of state law definitions of what constitutes elder abuse; and a lack of any central clearinghouse for collection of state or federal data concerning reports of elder abuse (in its different aspects).

Financial exploitation, emotional or physical abuse tend to have serious and life-shortening health effects for an elder.  Remember that a 2009 JAMA article on Elder Self-Neglect and Abuse and Mortality Risk stated that elders who have been abused have a 300% higher risk of death compared to their age cohort of those who have not suffered such abuse.  This is most certainly a health issue for at-risk elders and this fact makes it that much more important that doctors, particularly ER (or ED) doctors be trained to recognize the signs of abuse or self-neglect resulting from mistreatment.

The ER doctor sees not just the immediate physical effects or injuries of a physical abuse or emotional abuse (spiking blood pressure, increasing risk of stroke or heart attack) but they also see the effects of depression and other factors which both contribute to an elder’s isolation and vulnerability and are the ongoing results and manifestations of the elder’s victimization.

A recent Kaiser Health news article recently highlighted findings from a study in New York on increasing ER doctors’ awareness of signs of elder abuse.  Some of the training is around going behind the explanation of the injuries – usually from a fall or some other accident, and asking questions which may uncover the abuse which caused the “accident” and its injuries.  We have a long way to go to train more ER doctors to be up and running mandatory reports.  Doctors have made huge strides in recognizing other “accidents” or injuries resulting from domestic violence and child abuse and we need to have the same strides made for the detection and reporting of elder abuse.  It’s time!  We need to connect the ER doctors more effectively with the agencies involved in assisting victims – adult protection services and law enforcement agencies.

Here is an informative pdf from Florida State University’s National Prevention Toolkit on Domestic Violence for Medical Professionals. You might think it has to do with domestic violence, but it is a document that looks at each of the fifty states’ laws on reporting elder physical abuse. It identifies the reporting law for elder abuse, identifies who are the mandatory reporters (especially physicians and other health care professional) and provides some detail concerning the applicable civil and criminal statutes.

Why is it important to empower doctors with this information? An article from 2015 on physician screening for elder abuse observed:

Healthcare workers, more specifically Emergency Department physicians, are in a unique position in which they can not only screen and detect elder abuse in their patients, but also can change the abusive situation and prevent its continuation.

A brief article on emergency department care (filed under elder abuse treatment and management) urges doctors to take the time needed to assess a suspicious situation, noting that elders do not usually self-report and observing there may be concerns around balancing autonomy and safety.  Referral to APS is noted as “vital to decrease morbidity.”

Physicians and other health care professionals can provide important, necessary and perhaps life-saving medical care to victims of elder abuse.  Here is a link to a webinar on the ElderJustice.gov site to a webinar entitled “How EMTs Can Help Identify and Report Elder Abuse.”  When there is widely available training of medical professionals about how to ask and what to ask an elder on this difficult topic and there is also familiarity with available reporting units (APS or law enforcement) and sources for service referrals to assist the elder, elders in our community will be better served and the community will have another valuable resource for reporting incidents of abuse.

© Barbara E. Cashman 2017   www.DenverElderLaw.org

Financial Empowerment for Elders

The Mighty Tiber

I’m privileged to be the invited speaker for Denver City Councilwoman Kendra Black’s “Senior Series” program tomorrow morning on the topic “Financial Empowerment: Planning for Longevity.”  I hope it will be a lively Q & A session with the participants!

So what is this empowerment anyway? Merriam Webster’s online defines empower as:

transitive verb: (1) to give official authority or legal power to; (2) enable; and (3) to promote the self-actualization or influence of.

Empowerment has at least a couple layers here, but for my purposes in educating and assisting elders who are living longer and in greater number than ever before, the most important aspect is the “give legal power to” in the first definition.

What I’m thinking of are documents like durable powers of attorney – both medical and general (financial) as well as other documents like a living will, a disposition of last remains and other similar documents.

Modern estate planning traverses two different “time zones” if you will – both the longevity scenario which covers the incapacity and disability side of life among the living, particularly for a long life, as well as the other side of life, or what happens after someone passes away.  Empowerment can and does often involve both of these time zones, but it is critical that the first time zone be discussed and planned for because the longer we live, the greater our chances of being incapacitated (for short or longer term periods).  Empowerment here means a conversation not just about the inevitable (death) but also about what one’s preferences are in the event one cannot speak or communicate on their own.  But it also means enlisting support from our loved ones and friends, as well as our community, in the event we need help, support or protection.

That is a big part of what I will be addressing tomorrow.  The more we talk about these important matters, the easier the conversation becomes.  Some of these topics, like elder abuse and financial exploitation by adult children or caregivers, are still quite difficult to talk about – but they are necessary conversations!

I’ll be sure to share in a later post about what some of the participants concerns were and what we discussed.  In the meantime, I hope to see some of you at the Eisenhower Recreation Center (4300 East Dartmouth Ave., Denver) tomorrow at 10 a.m.!

© Barbara E. Cashman 2017   www.DenverElderLaw.org

 

Honoring Elder Mothers this Mother’s Day

 

denver elder law

Beautiful Hearts

There are many versions of the history of Mother’s Day and I found an excellent compilation at the National Women’s History Project.  As we all know, Mother’s Day will be celebrated (in this country) this Sunday, May 14, 2017.  There are many ways to honor our mothers – even if our mothers are no longer living.  In this post I’m tying together two seemingly disparate threads: how to honor our elder mothers on Mother’s Day by considering the plight of a large number of impoverished elder mothers if the American Health Care Act becomes the law of the land.

Last week I posted about long term care insurance, why it is helpful and . . .  how we shouldn’t be complacent about the availability of Medicaid services for poor and sick elders who lack the resources or savings to self-insure.  Little did I know that just hours after that post, I would get news of the U.S. House approving a version of the American Health Care Act which would, if it becomes law, gut Medicaid for millions of people, including elders!

What’s at stake?

Medicaid expansion under the ACA will be rolled back under the AHCA.  Here are some details about Medicaid expansion from a 3/26/17 Forbes article: From 2014 through 2016, the ACA’s Medicaid expansion population is funded 100% with federal dollars. Beginning this year, states gradually have to pick up some costs, but the federal government still picks up 90% or more of Medicaid expansion through 2020. It was a better deal than before the ACA, when Medicaid programs were funded via a much less generous split between state and federal tax dollars.  That article points out that the Medicaid expansion has been a boon to health insurance company giants like Aetna, Anthem, Centene, Humana and UnitedHealth Group, who have enrolled millions of new members under the expansion.

As this article from the Kaiser Family Foundation illustrates, the hardest hit under the AHCA appear to be nonelderly disabled adults, folks with conditions or diseases like cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, developmental disabilities, people affected by brain injuries and so on.  But the AHCA would adversely impact elders as well, by its move to a “block grant” to states (a fixed $$ amount for each beneficiary) as well as the elimination of the ACA’s protections for people with pre-existing conditions.   Of note is the “no” vote of U.S. Rep. Mike Coffman (R – CO) on the grounds of the AHCA’s failure to protect the relatively small number of persons with preexisting conditions, who would be left without any coverage.  You can read the AARP’s post about this here.

It is unlikely that elders on Medicaid will be heard from in large numbers about their loss of insurance coverage and benefits, but elders who will see their insurance premiums increase may be more vocal, and I think it’s a safe bet to count on the insurance companies (who benefitted from Medicaid expansion) to raise a hue and cry when the U.S. Senate examines the proposed legislation.  A Forbes article from 5/7/17 notes that “Of the 75.2 million Americans covered by Medicaid, 54.7 million are enrolled in private plans, a report from consulting firm PwC indicates. Much of the recent growth has come from Medicaid expansion, benefitting not only insurance companies but hospitals, doctors and other medical care providers.”

Without Medicaid funding from the federal government, which was the impetus for Medicaid expansion under the ACA,  states will be left on their own, with limited funds from federal “block grants” to cover a fraction of those persons who were enrolled and covered under Medicaid, or a fraction of those persons’ health care.  The Congressional Budget Office published its analysis of the AHCA on 3/13/17 and the summary states that the CBO and the JCT (Joint Committee on Taxation) “estimate that enacting the American Health Care Act would reduce federal deficits by $337 billion over the coming decade and increase the number of people who are uninsured by 24 million in 2026 relative to current law.”

For more information about the AHCA’s impact in Colorado, you can read a Denver Post article here from several weeks back.  The American Medical Association, which opposed the AHCA prior to its House approval, issued this statement on May 4, 2017, criticizing the bill for its results which would cause millions of Americans to lost access to quality, affordable healthcare and un-insuring those with pre-existing conditions.  Many of those folks with pre-existing conditions are elders.

If you aren’t tired of seeing all these links and want to read more, here’s a link to a New York Times article about who would be the winners and the losers under the AHCA.

Please consider honoring mothers by educating yourself about the AHCA and sharing your thoughts and opinions with others, perhaps even your elected officials.  It’s time to make the conversation about something other than money…

© Barbara E. Cashman 2017   www.DenverElderLaw.org

 

 

Do You Need Long Term Care Insurance?

Just Curious!

Like many other questions I pose to clients, who ask me the question first – my answer often begins with . . . “it depends.”  This particular question is often posed by clients doing pre-retirement planning and this may be the best time to be considering one’s options about how best to plan for retirement.  I would consider how one answers this question posed in the title to be part of how we look at our elderhood and its challenges and uncertainties, about which I have recently blogged.  So I will start with some basic questions.

How long will you live?

Sure, I bought a crystal ball a couple years back from a local shop, Grandpa’s Attic in Littleton, but I haven’t yet found a reputable online “gazing” course to hone my crystal ball reading skills. . . . ! Let me know if you have any leads on that.

Will you have health conditions that will make it difficult for you to live independently?

Some of us already have chronic health issues by the time we hit our 50’s or 60’s, so this might be a “heads up” that things could get progressively more difficult.  But many of us just want to simply pretend that a downturn in our health status isn’t likely and so somehow it wouldn’t be possible that we will outlive our financial resources.

Will you have enough money saved to cover for the needed additional care?

Many elders I know want to leave something to their kids after they’re gone.  How does the need to pay for care services, which one typically had been paying for previously in one form or another (if the elder had not been a longtime recipient of government benefits) adversely impact the person’s ability to leave a legacy to family members? Well, simply put, it can pit your own well-being and financial wherewithal against your child’s desire to inherit from you.  I know, it sounds crass and the kind of thing that would never happen to you . . . but the fact is that we elder law attorneys see a fair amount of this.  Why provide the temptation for your kids, to pit your ability to pay for your care against their ability to inherit funds from you?

If you don’t have sufficient funds to pay, who will pay for your care?

Many people assume that if they can’t pay their own way, perhaps family members will care for them.  In fact, our health care system (and I am reminded of Walter Cronkite’s quote “America’s health care system is neither healthy, caring, nor a system”) relies heavily on family caregivers to provide free services to help manage their loved one’s care, improve the patient’s quality of life, as well as reduce costs to the health care system.  Many folks simply want to assume that they will be able to stay in their home, regardless of their physical or medical condition.  This behavior has a name: avoidance or denial!

Will there be sufficient levels of public assistance available in the even you run out of money?

If you think that there will be plenty of money from your fellow taxpayers to fund your care, you might want to reconsider! The Medicaid expansion in Colorado under the Affordable Care Act made many more funds and programs available to impoverished elders who could not afford long term care services, but the continuation of these funds and services is not a sure thing!  The failed American Health Care Act would have gutted those funds available for elders.  Read more here from Justice in Aging’s blog.

Do you already assume that long term care insurance is going to be too expensive?

I met a financial advisor last year who was fairly new to the business, she told me that only “wealthy people” get LTC insurance. I explained to her in my experience that was not the case!  There are people who make getting a LTC policy a financial priority, and they aren’t always those folks who can otherwise afford easily to self-insure – meaning the wealthy who can afford a Cadillac LTC policy or who have enough funds to privately pay for care without making a dent in their kids’ inheritance.

The fact is, there are more ways to fund the purchase of an LTC policy than you can shake a stick at!  Here’s an article by Wade Pfau from Forbes magazine that has several helpful links to the smorgasbord of options currently available.

© Barbara E. Cashman 2017   www.DenverElderLaw.org

 

What If We Declared a War on Elder Abuse?

Diana in Venice

What will it take to raise the public’s awareness of the prevalence of elder abuse? Here is a recent New York Times article about a woman from Washington state, a granddaughter of a victim of elder financial exploitation, who has made her mission in life to secure further legal protection for vulnerable elders.  I tip my hat to the Elder Law Profs blog for the mention of this article.  For this post, I’m focusing primarily on financial fraud and exploitation of elders.

Colorado statistics over the last several years (since the change in law concerning mandatory reporting of elder abuse and investigation by law enforcement) indicate the numbers continue to rise dramatically.  Read this Denver Post article from last fall with some of the breathtaking numbers in Colorado.  The national numbers are a bit more complicated, due in part to the variances of state laws concerning elder abuse – not all states have made it a crime to financially exploit an elder, as well as how such crimes get reported.  In Colorado, law enforcement and county adult protective services are part of the investigative framework for suspected elder abuse and some district attorneys’ offices have specialized prosecutors for such crimes.  The federal law, the Elder Justice Act – about which I have previously written, could provide an important means for developing a more systematic approach to reporting (among other important things) remains only partly funded.

A 2011 study published by MetLife Mature Market Institute estimates the financial loss by victims of elder financial crimes and exploitation exceeds $2.9 billion dollars annually, but this number remains controversial as other studies have estimated $17 billion or $36 billion.  Read about the variety of those numbers here.

How do we define fraud on elders?  That is a big part of the problem with a lack of any “standardized” way to identify such fraud and abuse so as to generate reportable numbers for particular types of fraud and abuse.  One thing that most are certain of is that the exploitation and fraud are both widely underreported –due to the shame and embarrassment factor, particularly when the perpetrator is a family member, friend or neighbor (occupying a position of trust).

Know the risk factors

Forbes recently ran an article by John Wasik that had a great summary of four of these which consider the elder’s behavior:

  • Poor Physical Health. Those who are physically compromised are unlikely to be focused on financial matters. They are often vulnerable to swindles.
  • Cognitive Impairment. When the ability to do basic things like read a banking statement or balance a checkbook declines, that’s when you have to pay attention. Those with declining math skills will not be asking important questions about new investing “opportunities.”
  • Difficulty in Activities of Daily Living. If a person has trouble feeding themselves, bathing or shopping, that’s a big set of red flags. That also means that they will have trouble managing money.
  • Social Isolation.Are they all alone? Then they won’t have the support of a network of peers, who could warn about scams.

Recognize the signs

The signs are of course numerous and varied, but keep in mind that there are many ways in which the behavior of the perpetrator of the fraud or exploitation of the elder mimics that of a perpetrator of domestic violence.

  • Use and abuse of control of the elder’s finances, such as taking, misusing, or using without the elder’s knowledge or permission their money or property;
  • Forging, forcing, or using deception, coercion or undue influence to get an elder person’s signature on a legal document – this could include signing over title to a home or other asset, or a power of attorney or a will;
  • Forging or otherwise forcing, or using deception or other inappropriate means to misappropriate funds from a pension or other retirement income, to cash an elder’s checks without permission or authorization;
  • Abusing joint signature authority on a bank account or misusing ATMs or credit cards;
  • Exploitation through a fiduciary relationship – such as an agent under a financial power of attorney acting beyond the scope of the agent’s authority, or improperly using the authority provided by a conservatorship, trust, etc.
  • Misleading an elder by providing true but misleading information that influences the elder person’s use or assignment of assets, persuading an impaired elder person to change a will or insurance policy to alter who benefits from the will or policy;
  • Promising long-term or lifelong care in exchange for money or property and not following through on the promise, overcharging for or not delivering caregiving services; and
  • Denying elders access to their money or preventing them from controlling their assets or gaining information about their assets.

Keep in mind that neither of these lists is comprehensive or exhaustive!

Report suspected abuse, exploitation or fraud

If you aren’t sure who to call and the situation doesn’t require a 911 call, use the National Center on Elder Abuse’s resource page to determine who to call.

The only way we will get a better handle on the extent and pervasiveness of elder financial abuse and exploitation is to become more familiar with it so that we know how to ask those whom we seek to protect.

© Barbara E. Cashman 2017   www.DenverElderLaw.org