New Proposed Federal Legislation to Combat Elder Abuse

Italian Ceiling

 

The Elder Abuse Prevention and Prosecution Act (S. 178), passed the U.S. Senate on August 1, 2017.  You can read the text of the bill here.  It was sponsored by a bipartisan group of Senators.  It has moved to the House of Representatives for their review.

This bill has several important provisions which would support more federal involvement in areas of elder abuse and financial exploitation reporting and prosecution.  Some of these include: training federal law enforcement (FBI) in elder abuse detection; coordinating data collection and establishing best practices for data collection and sharing among local, state and federal agencies involved in reporting and prosecuting elder abuse; enhancing the services available under the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office for Victims of Crime so as to specifically include those aged 60 or older; imposing an enhanced penalty for those convicted of the specifically defined telemarketing or email marketing fraud under the federal telemarketing fraud statute; and some efforts directed toward guardianship oversight and abuse prevention.  The only problem with all the great things that this proposed new law could do is that there is no money allocated for its proposed activities.  If the bill makes it through Congress and is passed into law, it will be in a situation similar to the 2010 Elder Justice Act, many substantive parts of which lack funding for its important work.

Notwithstanding the important fiscal detail, it is important legislation in several ways that can help coordinate the woefully inadequate means of reporting elder abuse.  The federal government could help to standardize the definitions of elder abuse for the purpose of getting a clearer picture of its prevalence for reporting purposes.  Every state has its own laws and definitions concerning its elder abuse  detection and reporting  standards and some of these vary wildly, making the standardization of reporting incidents of elder abuse that much more difficult.

The federal government’s involvement here could assist greatly in getting a better idea of just how prevalent are certain types of elder abuse.  At the present time, there are numerous difficulties figuring out these important details and this obviously can interfere with the allocation of resources needed to adequately respond to the worsening problem of elder abuse and exploitation.

The numbers concerning the incidence of elder abuse and exploitation are already sickening to consider and they appear to be rising.  It is of critical importance to have adequate support for prevention and prosecution to combat this.

The bill has been endorsed by the bipartisan Elder Justice Coalition,  the American Bar Association and  the Consumer’s Union, among other groups.

If you think this legislation sounds like a good idea to help elders and their loved ones, then by all means be sure to contact your U.S. Congress member and share your opinion about this important legislation!

Stay tuned for a blog post about another piece of proposed legislation which has been introduced in the U.S. House (H.R. 2505) and Senate (S. 1151) known as the Credit for Caring Act of 2017.

© 2017 Barbara Cashman  www.DenverElderLaw.org

 

Financial Empowerment for Elders

The Mighty Tiber

I’m privileged to be the invited speaker for Denver City Councilwoman Kendra Black’s “Senior Series” program tomorrow morning on the topic “Financial Empowerment: Planning for Longevity.”  I hope it will be a lively Q & A session with the participants!

So what is this empowerment anyway? Merriam Webster’s online defines empower as:

transitive verb: (1) to give official authority or legal power to; (2) enable; and (3) to promote the self-actualization or influence of.

Empowerment has at least a couple layers here, but for my purposes in educating and assisting elders who are living longer and in greater number than ever before, the most important aspect is the “give legal power to” in the first definition.

What I’m thinking of are documents like durable powers of attorney – both medical and general (financial) as well as other documents like a living will, a disposition of last remains and other similar documents.

Modern estate planning traverses two different “time zones” if you will – both the longevity scenario which covers the incapacity and disability side of life among the living, particularly for a long life, as well as the other side of life, or what happens after someone passes away.  Empowerment can and does often involve both of these time zones, but it is critical that the first time zone be discussed and planned for because the longer we live, the greater our chances of being incapacitated (for short or longer term periods).  Empowerment here means a conversation not just about the inevitable (death) but also about what one’s preferences are in the event one cannot speak or communicate on their own.  But it also means enlisting support from our loved ones and friends, as well as our community, in the event we need help, support or protection.

That is a big part of what I will be addressing tomorrow.  The more we talk about these important matters, the easier the conversation becomes.  Some of these topics, like elder abuse and financial exploitation by adult children or caregivers, are still quite difficult to talk about – but they are necessary conversations!

I’ll be sure to share in a later post about what some of the participants concerns were and what we discussed.  In the meantime, I hope to see some of you at the Eisenhower Recreation Center (4300 East Dartmouth Ave., Denver) tomorrow at 10 a.m.!

© Barbara E. Cashman 2017   www.DenverElderLaw.org

 

The Eclipse and the End of Life As We Know It

True Illusion

The eclipse that is set to occur on Monday, August 21, 2017 is a big deal. I have several friends who are traveling to get a better view of this event.  One couple I know is going to Fort Laramie, Wyoming and other friends to McCook, Nebraska.  Here’s a handy map that shows the strip of total eclipse. Based on my research, the last coast to coast eclipse in the US was ninety-nine years ago.  I remember seeing a partial eclipse in Denver almost thirty years ago.  It was pretty cool.  So, if you want to “prepare” for this eclipse, go to this link on the NASA website.  After all, it’s set to last for nearly three hours, reaching its maximum at 11:47 a.m. in my neck of the woods.

So what is it about the eclipse that would cause me to couple it with. . . the end of life?!  Well, here goes.

The word eclipse comes from the Greek ekleipsis, which means abandonment, cessation, failing, omission or flaw.

But remember that the eclipse merely obscures the sun from our sight – the moon appearing before the sun to block it does not extinguish the sun, but from our eyesight-based superficial understanding of what we think we see. . . . well, what’s the difference?

It’s a matter of vision, not eyesight.

Perhaps we eclipse-seekers are simply in search of awe, what some of our forebears would call miracles. Where should we search – in the familiar places or the unfamiliar, even uncomfortable ones? That’s hard to say. Few of us look for that awe in the mundane and everyday, but that is almost always where it seems to be found, discovered, seen.

This awe can cause a cognitive shift in our awareness, as in the “overview effect.” The term was first coined by Frank White in his 1987 book The Overview Effect — Space Exploration and Human Evolution and is described in this Wikipedia entry as

the experience of seeing firsthand the reality of the Earth in space, which is immediately understood to be a tiny, fragile ball of life, “hanging in the void”, shielded and nourished by a paper-thin atmosphere. From space, national boundaries vanish, the conflicts that divide people become less important, and the need to create a planetary society with the united will to protect this “pale blue dot” becomes both obvious and imperative.

It strikes me that this eclipse, and its draw to our experience of life, is not unlike the awe at the end of life. The drawing and that movement is perhaps generated in different directions so to speak. We can “attend” the eclipse and experience it in ways we enjoy, but the end of our life demands a different kind of presence – one no less awe-some, one that we may think we are not quite ready to experience.

In his book Places of the Heart: The Psychogeography of Everyday Life, Colin Ellard looks at places of awe.  At 154 of the book he looks at research into experiences of awe which focus on two essential aspects: a feeling of vastness and a sense of accommodation.  Vastness is the feeling of hugeness and grandeur, while accommodation describes our response to what created the feeling.  Ellard notes this often involves contradiction. An excellent article on awe (and its self-diminishing aspects) and prosocial behavior can be found here.

What is the inevitable here? We can easily face and even celebrate the inevitable when it is. . . . not too close and personal!  But what of dying and how can we recognize it as it approaches and obscures our sight ? Most of us don’t want to see death coming, so we turn away!

When people refuse to have the conversation about dying and its uncertain circumstances, to name or appoint someone to speak for them in the event they are unable to do so on their own, well – then the doctors will decide for you.  Here’s an interview with Dr. Jessica Zitter, ICU and palliative care doc and author of Extreme Measure, a book about the ethics of end of life medicine. Thanks for sharing that with me Georgine!

So maybe there is some preparing we can do for the eclipse(s) of our life. . . .   I think these Buddhist sayings (dhammas) sum up this essential changeable quality of our nature and that of the cosmos most succinctly:

I am of the nature to decay, I have not gone beyond decay.
I am of the nature to be diseased, I have not gone beyond disease.
I am of the nature to die, I have not gone beyond death.
All that is mine, dear and delightful, will change and vanish.

It’s a hard place to just be, to be with the uncertainty – will there be a sun that returns after the moon passes over it completely?

The eclipse of –  disease, misfortune, old age, fear of change, death.

Perhaps we can see this eclipse opportunity as an invitation, a path, to assist us in recalling how to revere, to feel deep respect or awe for something, for our relationship with the world and with each other.  In this respect, we remember reverence through nature – our nature – not outside, but inside each of us.

© 2017 Barbara Cashman  www.DenverElderLaw.org

Capacity, Incapacity and Vulnerability

Old boats on the Isle of Mull

This is the last post (for now at least) on the topic of capacity and incapacity. In my field of practice, I must be comfortable with making assessments of capacity concerning potential clients and I must also be familiar with the panoply of assessment tools used by the medical establishment (and psychologists who perform neuropsychological evaluations of capacity).

Capacity and incapacity are legal constructs, but they often arise within a medical context and are typically established (in the Colorado probate code as a requirement for a physician’s letter to support a petition for guardianship) with reference to medical evidence relating to a person’s cognitive capacities or mental status.  Interestingly, issues of medical capacity, or what is commonly referred to as “decisional capacity,” is something in which the court system is rarely involved.  So this relationship between legal and medical capacity is not much of a two way street!

In this post I’m looking at where these two notions of capacity and incapacity can meet.  Sometimes we hear that an elder is not capable of doing something any longer – for physical, cognitive, psychological or emotional reasons, and we often fail to consider the intersections of these parts of each of us as people.  We must depend on the integration of those capacities for our continued functioning.  Sometimes it can be very difficult to determine whether a difficulty is short lived or temporary or whether it is a harbinger of greater difficulties which lie ahead.  We each face these challenges alone, but we must rely on others in this stage of our lives, just as we have in earlier, higher functioning stages of our lives – but most of us  struggle mightily with our vulnerability.  The NIH website has a list of resources available for dementia caregivers available here.

There is an intersection between disability law and elder law in the approach to how we facilitate the assisted decision-making on behalf of another as well as the living arrangements for an incapacitated adult.  This is the term  ”least restrictive means” or also “least restrictive environment.”   The former term is distinguished from regulatory and constitutional law, in the probate incapacity context it is the language of the preference for limited guardianship over unlimited or plenary guardianship.  For the latter, we see the term in the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) which refers to inclusion and mainstreaming, which are of obvious relevance and value to elders who are losing or have lost capacity (ies).

The parallels between the rights of the disabled and the rights of incapacitated elders are numerous.  A large number of elder law attorneys practice in both fields of law because there are so many similarities.  Here’s a link to the Guardianship Alliance of Colorado’s website, which has great resources relating to protecting adults with disabilities.

This determination of incapacity sounds like a one-way street from which there is no turning back, but that is not the whole story.  I came across an interesting article by law professor Nina Kohn and Catheryn Ross about how a person previously stripped of “legal personhood” can regain their legal status.  You can read “Lawyers for Legal Ghosts: The Legality and Ethics of Representing Persons Subject to Guardianshiphere.  The introduction recounts the story of Jenny Hatch, a young woman with Down’s syndrome who was a ward of the state and who successfully challenged not only the terms and conditions of her guardianship, but also her right to make decisions for herself.

Elders in Colorado are part of a “protected class” of persons in our elder abuse statute.  Some of my colleagues take offense at the reference to age because they are close to that age (70) and still don’t want to think of themselves as “old” or in need of protection.   I suspect they don’t consider themselves “old” because they don’t have enough youngsters in close proximity. . . .

What does incapacity mean for a person once a probate court has determined the person incapacitated?

Incapacity determinations by probate courts generally strip a previously capacitated adult of nearly all of their civil rights.  In Colorado, wards (what a person who is named as Respondent in a guardianship petition is called after the court determines the person is incapacitated and in need of a guardian) can still exercise their right to vote.  So once a persons is stripped of those civil rights, a ward essentially ceases to exist in many ways or is legally dead.  This is one aspect of vulnerability.

If you find this patently offensive, please consider the historical common law rules of marriage and property which were “imported” into North America by the colonists.  Hey, didn’t we recently celebrate our independence on the Fourth of July a month ago?! These “coverture laws” basically reduced the legal status of an unmarried adult (otherwise capacitated) woman from an adult to the legal status of an infant once she was married.  These coverture laws pertained to a married woman’s legal rights to own property, to sign contracts, make a will and many other useful matters.  A married woman was otherwise legally incapacitated, but she could seek relief from a court of equity.  Connecticut was one of the first states to establish the property rights of married women.  Back in those early days, the courts of law were separate from the courts of equity, the latter were often referred to as chancery courts.  Those courts were merged with courts of law in many court systems but still exist as separate courts in states like Delaware.  In Colorado’s system of “combined courts” a court sitting in probate is both a court of law (employing the statutory probate code as well as case law) and a court of equity.  Equity is specifically referred to in our probate code, but the two concepts are still legally distinguished from each other because they are different sources of law and the remedies it affords parties.

A ward can regain his or her legal status of personhood – but it can be daunting.  In Colorado, there is a special form for that.   A psychologist I know recently contacted me about getting this form and providing a supporting letter for their client – here is the form from the state judicial website JDF 852.  If imposition of a guardianship over a ward is legal death, then termination of the guardianship based on a restoration (or re-evaluation) of capacity is akin to resurrection.  I won’t go into the gnarly details about the attorney’s ethical rules of representing wards seeking termination of their guardianships, but the Kohn article above is an excellent overview of how attorneys can overcome some of the challenges inherent in our ethical rules to assist those persons in getting their legal personhood or at least some of their rights restored.  Attorneys need to assist these wards to protect fundamental rights.

That’s all for now….

© Barbara E. Cashman 2017   www.DenverElderLaw.org